Why you no longer put a photo on your resume


I recently had a professional photographer ask why you no longer include photos on a resume.

CV Saviour, a recruitment agency, provide a very clear and detailed explanation of how job applications are now processed, and give the reasons for why photos can be problematic.

http://cvsaviour.com.au/8-things-you-need-to-know-about-applicant-tracking-systems/

If you have the time and you are about to apply for a job, the article is well worth a read, as it fully outlines the critical role of Application Tracking Systems (ATS) in processing job applications from a recruitment agency perspective. It also provides excellent advice on how to format your resume for online applications.

Essentially, an ATS is the first point of contact that your resume will have with a company. The ATS is the software used to check all resumes, selection criteria etc. To be successful in having your application read by the ATS, formatting needs to be kept very simple, i.e. no text boxes, logos, photos, tables etc. and you need to meet the keyword requirements; otherwise the ATS will reject the application. The only applications that will be read by a human, the next stage, will be if your application has been accepted by the ATS. The software is used by more than 80% of organisations for recruitment purposes in Australia today.

Photos can be a problem for the ATS because some systems cannot read photos or extract data from them and so the ATS will immediately reject the entire application. The suggestion is that, as a rule of thumb, don’t include a photo on your resume, but keep it for LinkedIn, unless you’re a model or an actor, and it is asked for.


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